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The Hills and Whishaw Company

in Archangel and St Petersburg

 


Deciphering Hills & Whishaw Seals

   Hills and Whishaw (ХИЛЛCЪ И BИШAУ) set up businesses in Archangel in 1842.

 They used the flax from a district of Russia called Vologda (BOЛOГДA) and put this name on their Archangel seals.  Dew-retted flax from Vologda was of very high quality .. grown on the banks of the rivers Viledga (Spolvychegodsh region) and Sukhona (Ustyug region). Eventually most of the trade diverted to St Petersburg and the Baltic ports which was less effected by the severe Russian winters.  Hills and Whishaw notation was usually Г.Г (G.G.) instead of the normal AP (Archangel Port). Some have II which is regarded as the Roman numeral 2 ..

Folly Ghyll
Man FG01

Г.Г.

ХИЛЛCЪ И BИШAУ

1862 П

KУДEЛЬ
1" COPT
BOЛOГДA
KUDELYA
1st SORT
VOLOGDA

IDS 681

JS 242

DMP 08

Г.Г.

ХИЛЛCЪ И BИШAУ

1864 П

KУДEЛЬ
1" COPT
BOЛOГДA

KUDELYA
1st SORT
VOLOGDA

JS 241
DMP 07

no photo

Г.Г.

ХИЛЛCЪ И BИШAУ

1864 П

no photo

KУДEЛЬ
1" COPT
BOЛOГДA
KUDELYA

1st SORT

VOLOGDA

  KUDELYA (Tow) is the coarse broken part of hemp or flax after the heckling and Scutching processes

 

 

 

 

 

 

IDS
1346

HILLS & WHISHAW
BИШAУ
(VISHAU)

HILLS & WHISHAW
N.1

bagseals.org

IDS
1347

A.G.WHISHAW & Co
II (2)

AУ

probably AU of

BИШAУ (VISHAU)

bagseals.org

           
       

   Hills and Whishaw notation was usually I.I. instead of the normal AP (Archangel Port)

 but this next seal throws up all sorts of questions.  Is it really AП (AP) Archangel Port

IDS
1344

AП 1И
AP (lig) Archangel Port

number1 grade

HILLS & WHISHAW
(is that a mouse
or a

very ornate number 1)

Myself, I think

it says П 1И

The A shown in yellow is an artistic representation of a piece of hemp cord tying the

pink П (P for Penka = hemp) together with the green 1И   for 1st Sort or Grade hemp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Eventually most of Hills and Whishaw trade diverted to St Petersburg and the Baltic

 ports which were less effected by the severe Russian winters and where they formed partnerships with other companies such as AB Damatskoi, and the Cazalet family.

Towards the end of the 19th century they were exporting flax, hemp, coal and peat.

  Paired seals for AB Damatskoi with Hills and Whishaw

#

OBVERSE  click thumbnail

REVERSE click thumbnail

IDS
6
82

AB ДAMAЦKOИ
1847  CПБ 
ФEДOCEИ

HILLS &
II (2)
WISHAW

 NE Fife Museums
67 CUPMS:

1999.62.50

  IDS 682   AB Damatskoi ... 1847 ... SPB ... Fedosei        paired with       II  Hills and Wishaw

IDS
6
83

AB ДAMAЦKOИ
1847  CПБ 
ФEДOCEИ

HILLS &
II (2)
WISHAW

 Perth Museum
9 PERMG:

1992.142.1

  IDS 683   AB Damatskoi ... 1847 ... SPB ... Fedosei        paired with       II  Hills and Wishaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

           
           

 Notes from Stuart F Elton of Bagseals.org.

  For two centuries after the foundation of St Petersburg 1703, the British merchant community- exercised a remarkable influence over the city's economic relations with the wider world. This community operated as a 'City of London' in miniature, and where the merchants led others--diplomats, travellers, soldiers, sailors, engineers, craftsmen and others-- followed.The St Petersburg Exchange, built in the early 19th century and painted in 1891 by Alexander Beggrov. Englishman Edwin Coates working in the works' manager's office of Thornton's thread mill. St Petersburg, shortly before the First World War.

    To the English in the sixteenth century the idea of a northern route to the Indies had a particular appeal, and in 1553, in search of such a passage, the Edward Bonaventure cast anchor off the southern shore of the White Sea. For England, this venture established a thriving trade with Russia through Archangel; for Russia, it offered the prospect of secure and direct commercial links with Western Europe. The ship's return to England heralded the formation in London of the Muscovy Company, which sent annual cargoes of cloth, silks, tropical and Mediterranean goods in return for pelts, wax, tar and pitch. Finding it more economical to export Russian hemp in a processed form, English merchants set up a rope works near Archangel. It soon enjoyed a high reputation. (...houses both in St Petersburg and an important credit-granting centre in Western Europe--increasingly in London. One such, Hill Wishaw, also had political influence through Thomas Mitchell, the senior partner of its London agents, who was Liberal MP for Bridport...) from 'On the Banks of the Neva: British Merchants in St Petersburg before the Russian Revolution'. Magazine article by Stuart Thompstone; History Today, Vol. 53, December 2003.

  The Whishaws were one of several interrelated Anglo-Russian trading families that flourished in St Petersburg before the Revolution. Her father, Bernhard Whishaw (1779-1868), and various relatives resettled in Cheltenham during the late 19th century, and several of them were buried in Leckhampton Churchyard. Bernhard Whishaw was an imposing figure, six feet tall, with a red beard but no moustache or whiskers. He was a senior partner of the firm Hills and Whishaw, by far the oldest in St Petersburg, and when he entered the Exchange there, everyone in the building would bow with great respect.

 

  A Wikipedia entry for Fred Whishaw also mentions the company - Frederick James Whishaw was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, to English-born parents, Bernard Whishaw of Cheltenham and Isabel Maria Cattley, on 14 March 1854; he was one of eight children. His family had been in Russia since the 18th century. ... Unhappy with his occupation, Whishaw left Hills & Whishaw and eventually emigrated to England after his marriage to Ethel Charlotte Moberly on 30 March 1880.
 

   On the Hills side the Probate copy of the will (dated 25 Mar 1867) of Thomas " Empowers his trustees to continue loans he has made to the firms of Hills and Whishaw, St Petersburg, Russia (in which he is a partner), and James Hill and Sons, London, on terms they think fit."

 

   Different Hills & Whishaw seals can be seen in John Sullivan, 'Russian Cloth Seals in Britain Trade, Textiles and Origins', 2012, Figs. 30 a and b and 31 a and b (see IDS 682 and IDS 683 above). More interesting detail on the families can be found on page 26 ("Alfred Whishaw ... was by 1861 a wholesale trader at the port of St Petersburg in the firm of *A.G. Whishaw), page 34 ("Hills and Whishaw, established in Archangel around 1842 by William Whishaw.") and page 46.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 



Different Hills & Whishaw seals can be seen in John Sullivan, 'Russian Cloth Seals in Britain Trade, Textiles and Origins', 2012, Figs. 30 a and b and 31 a and b. More interesting detail on the families can be found on page 26 ("Alfred Whishaw ... was by 1861 a wholesale trader at the port of St Petersburg in the firm of *A.G. Whishaw), page 34 ("Hills and Whishaw, established in Archangel around 1842 by William Whishaw.") and page 46.



 

Date: 25/09/12
Size:
Full size: 1361x793