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 aka PeaceHavens Project

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The meaning of Symbols on seals

 

The *T* Conundrum (see http://www.peacehavens.co.uk/BST.htm)

 

Crimping Pliers Symbols (see http://www.peacehavens.co.uk/BSCRIMP.htm)

 
  The Star * Conundrum http://www.peacehavens.co.uk/BSstar.htm

 

  The Crescent Conundrum   http://www.peacehavens.co.uk/BSCRESCENT.htm

 

Christian Fish/Key Symbols http://www.peacehavens.co.uk/BSFISHKEY.htm

 

Flax & Hemp Bar Symbols http://www.peacehavens.co.uk/BSBAR.htm

 

 

Misc Symbols, letter dates, + & X, Ship's Hulls, Caduceus, Anchor & Grapnel

 

Using letters and symbols for known dates

 

 

1803 eye

1804 bell

1805 A

1806 Б

1807 B

1808 Г

1809 Д

1810 E

 

 

 

  + & X symbols on Riga Bales

Riga Flax Bale Seals have crossed keys and +

 others have an X which is not strictly the Riga Coat of Arms.

I am speculating that the + symbol is used by Christian traders & the X by non Christians (perhaps Jews, of whom there were many in Riga) just as today's Christians use the word Christmas and the Socialist Media use the word Xmas, refusing to use the word Christ for fear of offending Atheists and Muslims.   (Then again + could be flax and X could be hemp).

+ + x x
       
 
IDS 1943 IDS IDS 1567  

+ Seals on flax bale seals are Christian Symbols +

 

  Russian State Tax Seals with Miscellaneous Symbols

ref

date

name

area

click

symbol

MM2006.13

1758

No 25

Malton

flax flower

IDS 1272

17*75

St Petersburg

Narva

Caduceus

IDS 1874

17*79

St Petersburg

Netherlands

T-bar

IDS 2280

17*80

Archangel

Netherlands

Sail

IDS 1474

17*82

Riga

Germany

Padlock

IDS 2292

17*82

St Petersburg

Netherlands

belay pin

IDS 2276

17*85

St Petersburg

Netherlands

Sail

IDS 1479

17*87

Riga

Germany

key

IDS 1301

17*88

Riga

N.Yorkshire

Padlock

IDS 1478

17*88

Riga

Germany

Padlock

IDS 1471

17*88

Riga

Germany

Padlock

IDS 2291

17*88

Riga

Ashover

Padlock

IDS 1302

17*89

St Petersburg

UK

hull

IDS 1875

17*89

St Petersburg

Netherlands

fish

IDS 1972

17*90

Archangel

Netherlands

hammer

IDS 1873

17*90

St Petersburg

Netherlands

hammer

IDS 1208

17*91

St Petersburg

France

hull or key

IDS 1651

17*93

Archangel

Norway

belay pin

IDS 1546

17*95

Archangel

UK

anchor

IDS 1890

17*97

St Petersburg

Netherlands

O

IDS 1925

17*97

St Petersburg

Newtownards

O

IDS 391

17*98

St Petersburg

Bridport

key

IDS 1502

17*98

St Petersburg

Netherlands

key

IDS 1047

17*99

St Petersburg

Cheshire

key

 

 

 

 

 

 

KRX 05

1813

-

-

food bowl

IDS 2060

1818

T ???

Knaresborough

horseshoe

 

 

 

The religious symbol 4 found on Cloth Seals also signifies Christianity

 

  The '4' (which can be back to front or upside down) actually has nothing to do with the Hindu-Arabic numeral 4 we are all familiar with today (as it appeared while the West was still using Roman numerals). The fact that it maps out the path the hand takes when making the sign of the cross is the simplest explanation. It appears to be rooted in Christianity, as the crescent anchor symbol is anchored in Jesus Christ ... and it's on a lot more than cloth seals as many different tradesmen used them. It was particularly popular with seafaring trades though none have yet been found on flax bale seals.. (Courtesy Stuart F Elton).

   

 

The Caduceus of Hermes

 The Caduceus is the winged staff of the messenger god Hermes who was the patron of trade & journeys. A very suitable logo for companies shipping trade goods overseas as in the many companies who traded flax and hemp from Russia.  Many buildings in St Petersburg have a protective Caduceus on their facade.

 

 

The Crossed Anchor and Grapnel of Sea & River Ports
   

  with an additional Anchor symbol and a belaying pin for a sailing ship's rigging. (Archangel Port).

 

The meaning of the circle symbol (O)

between the bows of the anchor and

grapnel of this St Petersburg River &

 Sea Port seal is unknown at present.

 Could be an abbreviation of..

 Otrasl ... Department

Obertsolnery .. Chief Customs Officers

or Oblast ..  an administrative division

A 1793 St Petersburg River and Sea Port Seal with an O symbol

IDS 823 belay pin

 

 

 

Oddities of Cyrillic Letters

A

Б

B

Г

Д

E

Ё

Ѣ

Ж

З

І

И

Й

К

Л

M

H

O

П

Р

С

Т

У

Ф

Ѳ

Х

Ц

Ч

Ш

Щ

Ы

Э

Ю

Я

A

B

V

G

D

E

Ё

E

Zh

Z

I

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

R

S

T

U

F

Th

Kh

Ts

Ch

Sh

Shch

Y

E

Yu

Ya

     Ь is an apostrophe '             Ъ is usually found at the end of a name

In Old Russian a T

may have 3 vertical

lines making it look

more like an M

 

 

In Old Russian this letter is used in place of the Cyrillic У which is the letter U in English (Latin)

 

An Ю rotated vertically

is used as a symbol for

the Russian State Arms

 on Customs tax seals.

 
 When two or more letters are joined together they are called a ligature.  A monogram is a motif made by overlapping or combining two or more letters or other graphemes to form one symbol. Monograms are often made by combining the initials of an individual or of a company, used as recognizable symbols or logos. A series of uncombined initials is properly referred to as a cypher and is not a monogram. The examples below are the ligatures known as monogram motifs.

HF    HP         F  an old Ф

- - - - - - - - - - -- - - -

 

From the Suffolk Medieval Graffiti Survey, VV symbols.

  Although probably one of the most common inscriptions to come across, on timber, stone, tombs and lead-work, it is also probably one of the most enigmatic. Often shown inverted to resemble a capital ‘M’, or even upon its side, some churches can be found to contain several dozen examples. The symbol has been traditionally associated with the cult of the Virgin Mary, and the ‘V V’ have been regarded as the initial letters of the term ‘Virgo Virginum’ (Virgin of Virgins). Whilst this may very well be the case with the obviously medieval examples, the fact is that the symbol continues to be used well into the 18th century – making it likely that, although a ‘traditional’ marking, its meaning may well have changed. It is also one of the few ritual protection marks that made the occasional cross-over into more traditional church art form. The west door of Fakenham church, in North Norfolk, contains a flint flushwork shield in each of the spandrels. One is a monogram of the name ‘MARIA’, being a reference to the Virgin Mary, whilst the other contains the enigmatic VV symbol.

 Of course, in the context of seal names the W usually means the letter W. (see http://www.medieval-graffiti-suffolk.co.uk)

 

 The History of the Cyrillic Alphabet

    The Cyrillic alphabet owes its name to the 9th century Byzantine missionary St. Cyril, who, along with his brother, Methodius, created the first Slavic alphabet—the Glagolithic—in order to translate Greek religious text to Slavic. It is on the basis of this alphabet that the Cyrillic alphabet was developed in the First Bulgarian Empire during the 10th century AD Learn_Russianby the followers of the brothers, who were beatified as saints.  Based on the Greek ceremonial script, the original Cyrillic alphabet included the 24 letters of the Greek alphabet and 19 letters for sounds specific to the Slavic language.

The Cyrillic alphabet has gone through many reforms in both Russia and other countries. In Russia, the first reformer of the Cyrillic was printer and publisher Ivan Fyodorov. He eliminated the letters Е and С and many forms of the letter О. Most reforms saw the number of letters decrease and the simplicity of their inscription increase. But the reverse has also happened: at the end of 18th century the Russian writer and historian Nikolay Karamzin suggested to introduce the letter Ё. Letters Э and Й were officially added to the alphabet in 18th century.     The Cyrillic alphabet achieved its current form in 1708 during the reign of Peter the Great. He introduced lower case characters (before all letters were written with capital letters) and mandated the use of westernized letter forms, making the modern Cyrillic similar to the modern Latin font.    The very existence of the Cyrillic alphabet in Russia was once under threat. In 1919 there was an idea to replace it with the Latin one and bring it into harmony with the alphabet used in Western countries. That could have made the process of learning Russian much easier for some, but this was not to be and we can still enjoy the masterpieces of Russian literature in their original script.    Today Cyrillic is the third official script of the European Union, following the Latin and Greek scripts. It is used in over 50 different languages, especially those of Slavic origin, mainly in Russia, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe. In Russia the Old Slavic language, which uses the Cyrillic alphabet has been historically used for religious services, and is sometimes used for these purposes today. The modern Russian alphabet differs from its forefather dramatically, and only experts will be able to tell how the letters of the original Cyrillic alphabet looked like and were read in texts using it.      Courtesy of RT.News

 

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Website design and photos by Ged Dodd
Director of The PeaceHavens Project.

The PeaceHavens Project

 Join here https://www.facebook.com/groups/PeaceHavens/

Thanks for your kind support .. Ged        ged.dodd@blueyonder.co.uk

Copyright 2020 © Ged Dodd

 aka PeaceHavens Project

 Click here for the terms
of free copy & share &
supporting your Project